New Paltz Times | Education

Sections
New Paltz proposed school budget increases taxes 2.8%

New Paltz proposed school budget increases taxes 2.8%

New Paltz school Board trustees and members of the public got a broad-brush look at the budget proposed for the 2019-20 school year at their March 4 meeting. Coming in at $62,255,505, it’s a 2.54% increase over last year, which would result in a 2.84% hike to the tax levy itself due to a challenging state aid environment, which could well get bleaker if proposals in this year’s state budget get passed.

New Paltz schools seek to set policy limiting cell-phone use

New Paltz schools seek to set policy limiting cell-phone use

New Paltz School Board trustees are going to try to beef up their support for administrators and teachers who wish to control the use of cell phones in their classrooms, but they want to use their authority rather than taxpayer money to make that happen. Teachers, particularly in the high school, have expressed frustration over the proliferation of the devices and the lack of clear policy guidance that would allow them to exercise some control over their use.

New Paltz boys’ basketball team wins third straight Class A title

New Paltz boys’ basketball team wins third straight Class A title

This one seemed improbable. After losing their all-star backcourt of Axel Rodriguez and Casey Burke from their two-straight Section 9 Class A title basketball teams, the New Paltz boys weren’t given much of a chance to do what they did on Saturday, March 7…win their third straight. But that’s what they did, beating number two seed Monticello 69-67 in overtime on a Jackson Soper three-pointer from deep in the corner with just 0:29 left on the clock. With the win, the Huguenots are the first Class A team to ever win back-to-back-to-back titles.

New Paltz School Board members hear pitch for “restorative justice”

New Paltz School Board members hear pitch for “restorative justice”

The concept of restorative justice is that, by empowering people to work through challenges together, problems can be resolved in a less punitive manner that results in fewer issues overall. In theory, successfully implementing restorative justice in the schools would mean fewer suspensions (in school or out), fewer referrals to administrators, fewer fights and conflicts and less time spent in detention. The primary practices involve securing consent and agreement from all participants (adult and child alike) in processes that involve “circles” in which all voices are heard.