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What the newspapers said 100 years ago

What the newspapers said 100 years ago

The ‘‘Our towns’’ column is compiled each month by Carol Johnson of the Haviland-Heidgerd Historical Collection. The entries have been copied from the October issues of the New Paltz Independent. To get a closer look at these newspapers of the past, visit the staff of the Haviland-Heidgerd Historical Collection at the Elting Memorial Library at 93 Main Street in New Paltz, or call 255-5030.

New Paltz’s Elting Library quietly marks 100 Years at current location

New Paltz’s Elting Library quietly marks 100 Years at current location

If you think you remember the Elting Memorial Library celebrating its centennial back in 2009, you’re not wrong. That was indeed 100 years from the date when seven women from the New Paltz Study Club, inspired by the opening of a new Normal School building after the original one was destroyed by a 1906 fire, decided that the town needed a Free Library Association. So, they opened a reading room at 60-62 Main Street: the first iteration of what was to become the modern library the town knows today. A few months later it relocated to larger quarters in the Nathan Van Wagenen building at 68 Main Street. The Regents of the University of the State of New York granted the New Paltz Free Library a provisional charter on April 1, 1909, and an absolute charter on December 2, 1915.

Coping with change during uncertain times

Coping with change during uncertain times

In the past seven months, the landscape of our daily lives has changed in ways we could have never imagined, unless we dwelled in the minds of fiction writers like Margaret Atwood or George Orwell. We’ve been transformed into a mask-wearing, hand-sanitizing, plexiglass-shielding, remote-almost-everything state of existence.

Never was a slave: Historic Huguenot Street launches online exhibit on builder Jacob Wynkoop

Never was a slave: Historic Huguenot Street launches online exhibit on builder Jacob Wynkoop

Historic Huguenot Street is poised to launch a new walking-tour app titled “Jacob Wynkoop: Building a Free Black Neighborhood” by the end of the month. The tour will be narrated by Chaundre Hall-Broomfield, a Newburgh native and a performer known for his dual roles as Hercules Mulligan and James Madison in the national tour of the Broadway musical phenomenon Hamilton with the Angelica company.