Almanac Weekly | History

Sections
Vying for the vista: Carleton Mabee’s final opus, Saving the Shawangunks

Vying for the vista: Carleton Mabee’s final opus, Saving the Shawangunks

The book is positioned as a celebration of nature’s fragile ecosystems and of the David v. Goliath community members (for David’s tactics, in this case, were largely litigatory) banded together to protect them. But in the moment-to-moment of the prose and in the very consciously balanced, 360-degree management of his facts, Mabee reveals himself mostly as a fastidious historian and no polemicist at all.

Red Hook’s Cruger Island once home to remarkable plundered Mayan sculptures

Red Hook’s Cruger Island once home to remarkable plundered Mayan sculptures

From the mid-1840s to about 1920, the shores of this island in Tivoli Bays served as the unlikely setting for a collection of Mayan sculptures brought more than 1,700 miles north from their points of origin. Back then, canoe excursions by moonlight were the height of dramatic entertainment. Explorers were folk heroes and on a steamy August night, it would have been easy to imagine you were moving up a previously uncharted river, with natives gazing out from the darkness.

Kingston rally to celebrate centennial of NYS women’s suffrage

Kingston rally to celebrate centennial of NYS women’s suffrage

Sunday, Oct. 22: New Yorkers get to start celebrating the centennial of women’s suffrage nearly three years earlier than the rest of the country. The 19th Amendment to the US Constitution was formally adopted on August 26, 1920. But it was in a referendum on November 6, 1917 that 54 percent of New York’s all-male voters approved the addition of a women’s suffrage amendment to our state constitution, after it had been approved by two successive State Legislatures. 

Don’t lose your head: Attractions near the real Sleepy Hollow

Don’t lose your head: Attractions near the real Sleepy Hollow

By the time Washington Irving moved to Sunnyside, he was renowned on two continents as “the first American man of letters.” He had already written both of his most famous stories, “Legend” and “Rip Van Winkle”; covered Aaron Burr’s treason trial for a newspaper; co-founded the literary magazine Salmagundi; coined the phrase “the almighty dollar,” as well as the nicknames “Gotham” for New York City and “Knickerbocker” for one of its residents; spawned the fiction that Christopher Columbus’ contemporaries believed the Earth to be flat; and, with his accounts of traditional Yorkshire Yuletide celebrations in his Bracebridge Hall stories, planted the seed of inspiration in Charles Dickens that would soon lead to the writing of A Christmas Carol.

Talk on FDR by Pulitzer laureate David Kennedy at DCC

Talk on FDR by Pulitzer laureate David Kennedy at DCC

Thursday, Oct. 19: Kennedy is the author of several books including Freedom from Fear: The American People in Depression and War. Freedom from Fear tells the story of the New Deal’s achievements, without slighting its shortcomings, contradictions and failures. It is a story rich in drama and peopled with unforgettable personalities, including the incandescent-but-enigmatic figure of Roosevelt himself. 

Professor Louie & the Crowmatix to play benefit in Hurley

Professor Louie & the Crowmatix to play benefit in Hurley

Saturday, Sept. 23: The Grammy-nominated band will donate all proceeds to support the mission of the Hurley Heritage Society. Professor Louie has recorded and produced music for many artists in LRS Studios in Hurley for more than 30 years. Located on the farm of John and Anna Kaufman, the studio looks out over the fields that inspired the critically acclaimed 2016 album, Music from Hurley Mountain.