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Ed Sanders unveils new biography of eminent historian Alf Evers

Ed Sanders unveils new biography of eminent historian Alf Evers

A true Renaissance man, Evers’ first big success as an author was in the field of children’s books, illustrated by his wife, Helen Bryant Baker. Together they published some 50 of them over a 23-year period, which came to an end in the early 1950s with the advent of the mass-produced (and much cheaper) Little Golden Books. By then Evers, who first moved to Woodstock in 1931, had begun writing articles on historical subjects on a regular basis for local newspapers and the New York Folklore Society, which eventually caught the attention of Ellin Roberts, a senior editor at Doubleday. It was she who recruited him to write a comprehensive history of the Catskills. It ended up taking him nine years, but the legwork paid off: The book is still considered the go-to source on its subject.

D&H Canal launches virtual programs

D&H Canal launches virtual programs

Where is Our Historian? follows staff historian Bill Merchant’s exploration of the remains of the 108-mile D&H Canal from Honesdale, PA to the Rondout in Kingston. The D&H Canal Virtual Museum is a tour that highlights the exhibits in the current museum. You can ask questions every Sunday at 2 p.m. on the D&H Facebook Live show, Sunday Afternoons With Our Historian.

Historic Huguenot digital initiatives

Historic Huguenot digital initiatives

Joining other institutions, Historic Huguenot Street has launched a new online programming initiative that includes videos, hands-on activities, special deals from the museum shop, and new ways to participate and explore its exhibitions, archives and collection.

How an enormous chain across the Hudson slowed British domination during the Revolutionary War

How an enormous chain across the Hudson slowed British domination during the Revolutionary War

The Great Chain could be dismantled and pulled ashore in winter, when the Hudson wasn’t navigable anyway, to protect it from being smashed apart by tide-tossed icebergs. Its placement in the river could also be adjusted using a pulley system. Just downriver, a second barrier of wooden booms was floated, making it nearly impossible for a ship to get up enough momentum to break through the chain – although the notorious traitor Benedict Arnold had advised the British that they could, when he handed over the plans to the fortification at West Point. They never tried.