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A time of ferment: The rise and legacy of Poughkeepsie brewing tycoon Matthew Vassar

A time of ferment: The rise and legacy of Poughkeepsie brewing tycoon Matthew Vassar

Matthew Vassar barely acquired any formal education, being kicked out of night school after throwing a bottle of ink at the schoolmaster who had just smacked him in the head with a ruler. A niece named Lydia Booth, who had begun her teaching career as a private tutor and opened the Cottage Hill Seminary on Poghkeepsie’s Garden Street, was the first to plant in Matthew’s mind the notion that a fully accredited college for women was direly needed.

Written in stone: The surprising career of Pine Hill’s scientist/philanthropist Henry Morton

Written in stone: The surprising career of Pine Hill’s scientist/philanthropist Henry Morton

In 1870 Morton became the first president of the newly founded Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, and used his own personal wealth to equip its labs with steam engines, tools and electrical equipment. He experimented and published widely, and was elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences. He also spent summers in the Catskills, and in 1897 he established Pine Hill’s first library.

$17M expansion of National Purple Heart Hall of Honor in New Windsor now underway

$17M expansion of National Purple Heart Hall of Honor in New Windsor now underway

The Purple Heart is the US military’s oldest medal, created here by General George Washington toward the end of the Revolutionary War to recognize meritorious service. New York governor Andrew Cuomo is touting the museum’s improvements as part of a multifaceted campaign to make New York State, home to nearly 750,000 military vets, “the most veteran-friendly state in America.”