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Global warming update and maybe check your home’s CO2 too

Global warming update and maybe check your home’s CO2 too

The Earth’s carbon dioxide level was 326 parts per million when I moved to Woodstock in 1972. By 1989, when my daughter was born, it had reached 352 ppm. Now this week in March 2021, it stands at 416 ppm. What’s worse, it used to rise by one ppm per year. It currently increases by three ppm annually.

Making Records: Scott Petito and the Zen of Jazz Production

Making Records: Scott Petito and the Zen of Jazz Production

For the sixth installment of the Making Records, I spoke with Scott Petito, the area native who, as a bassist and a producer, is well into the fifth decade of his prolific career. Scott has done it at all: he’s played with everybody, and he’s recorded everybody else. Space is tight, so I encourage you to check his website if you want his almost absurd bona fides. Otherwise, just take my word.

Local libraries offer much more than books

Local libraries offer much more than books

Technological advances have made “access to information” a necessity that requires most libraries to provide Internet and computer availability for their patrons. But a trend that has taken off recently, particularly since the public health crisis, is the lending of things: physical objects as well as places along the bandwidth.

New Paltz turns out as high schooler Laila Mach aces American Idol audition

New Paltz turns out as high schooler Laila Mach aces American Idol audition

The first audition out of the gate on Sunday night’s episode of American Idol was that of Laila Mach, a 15-year-old singer/songwriter from New Paltz. “You sound like you’re from New York,” said country star and Idol judge Luke Bryan with his Southern drawl. “Upstate New York,” corrected Mach, as she stood in front of music legends Katy Perry, Lionel Richie and Bryan on a bare stage in San Diego, on the brink of auditioning for the world’s most renowned and successful singing competition.

Tad Wise releases his song-diary: For the Record

Tad Wise releases his song-diary: For the Record

On For the Record, his first release in nearly two decades, the guitarist/songwriter, writer/journalist, and Woodstock historian Tad Wise presents a fully realized set of nine substantive, lyrically elaborative tunes, topical art songs disguised as sleek soul pop with an anchor in the sounds and dialects of ‘80s rock — the shimmery guitar, the super crisp and tight rhythm section. An elegant electric guitarist with a command of idiomatic harmony, texture and guitar arrangement, Wise did well to recruit these supra-A-list sidemen (as, I suppose, would we all), and also did well not to festoon too much else on top of this lithe and crisp trio sound — a harmonica here, a keyboard there, some vocal beds and not much else.