Economy

Just a transition

Just a transition

The George Washington School on Wall Street in Kingston was the venue last Friday evening and Saturday for what its organizers termed an unconference. An audience of 200 showed up for “Surviving the Future: Connection and Community in Unstable Times,” billed as both a summit and a progress report on the sustained efforts of the past few years to organize radical political, economic and cultural consciousness-raising in and around Kingston.

Providing inspiration

Providing inspiration

With the new Office of Economic Development, Ulster County Executive Pat Ryan wants to emphasize the importance of a new separate department and other measures to support his initiative “to grow and diversify our economy for all.” How well it will succeed will depend on the smarts, skills and inspiration breathed into it by its participants.

Time for realignment?

Time for realignment?

Ulster County executive Pat Ryan believes “the traditional approach to economic development alone will not drive the county’s success for the future.” To that end, last month he formed a working group called Ulster 2040 of what he termed “county business movers and shakers.” That diverse twelve-person group was given nine months to come up with a plan “to align our county with our natural, economic and social strengths, and to make the necessary investments to be successful in these key areas.” Easier said than done.

Something to chew on

Something to chew on

The all-day conference on migration and mental health at SUNY New Paltz this Friday, October 11, is coming at an opportune time. Though American history records several eras when conflict raged over immigrants and immigration, there have been few more virulent than what’s going on now.

That’s where the money is

That’s where the money is

Newly released bank data for Ulster County shows that the trend toward larger percentage gains in deposits for local and small regional banks than for the national banks is continuing.

New building, new ambitions

New building, new ambitions

Though the ribbon-cutting for the almost 19,500-square-foot Engineering Innovation Hub on the SUNY New Paltz campus September 17 had been widely anticipated, a press release announcing that Central Hudson, which had already granted the manufacturing center $250,000 over three years, was kicking in another $200,000 to the project (a $50,000 match has already been contributed by local companies) added further support for the event.

An appetite for the local

An appetite for the local

In 2011 New Paltz farmer Paul Alward, Bywater Bistro proprietor Sam Ullman and self-described “health nut” Joe Katona had teamed up with financier John Fitzgibbons to found Hudson Valley Harvest. They wanted the Hudson Valley to develop the kind of brand identity and degree of market organization in order to compete successfully with giant non-local producers and distributors. Hudson Valley Harvest has operated year-round since then from its leased headquarters in TechCity in the Town of Ulster.

The last hurrah?

The last hurrah?

This will probably be the second to last — at least for a while — of our occasional columns in this space about flight activities at Stewart Airport. The two years of Norwegian Air’s experiment with the Newburgh airport for low-cost international flights is coming to a close a week from this coming Sunday, on September 15. The most dramatic traffic boost in Stewart’s commercial history is about to come to an unwelcome end.