All posts by Lynn Woods

Remembering Leonard Van Dyke, Kingston’s first black alderman

Remembering Leonard Van Dyke, Kingston’s first black alderman

Back in the 1960s, Kingston residents Leonard Van Dyke and his wife, Vera, were instrumental in breaking down barriers to equality. Thanks to their activism—both held leadership positions in the Kingston branches of the NAACP and the Congress of Racial Justice (CORE)—discriminatory practices against blacks in the building trades union as well as in local housing were challenged.

Ulster expands Mobile Mental Health Team

Ulster expands Mobile Mental Health Team

While two teams have been on call from noon to 10 p.m. and only one team on call from 10 a.m. to noon, the service will be expanded to a second team on call during the morning hours. Beginning in 2021, the Mobile Mental Health Team will also include a dispatcher at the 911 call center, who “will be a licensed clinician who will assist the 911 center operators in determining the appropriate intervention needed to respond to calls from individuals reporting on a behavioral-health-related issue.”

New exhibits to see in-person this month

New exhibits to see in-person this month

Not to be missed is the Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art’s New Folk exhibition, Jim Holl’s solo show of paintings and sculptures at Lockwood Gallery, a four-person exhibition of paintings at Green Kill, and works by Judy Pfaff and the three prizewinners of the Midtown Arts District’s first annual group show at the Arts Society of Kingston. All the shows are up through October.

Cavernous former steamboat building in Kingston transformed into gallery space

Cavernous former steamboat building in Kingston transformed into gallery space

In this summer of shutdowns, there’s been a flicker of life on the Kingston waterfront. ArtPort, an exhibition and cultural activities space that opened in the historic Cornell Steamboat Building last December, re-opened its doors on Saturday and Sunday afternoons in late June (after having closed mid-exhibit, along with the rest of the state, in mid-March). Artworks are arranged on the first and second floors of the cavernous historic building, which was built to maintain the fleet of tugboats that the Cornell Steamboat Company owned and deployed in the Hudson Valley from the mid-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century.