All posts by Brian Hollander

20 years and 82 floors later, Chris Hardej knows fate was on his side on 9/11

20 years and 82 floors later, Chris Hardej knows fate was on his side on 9/11

Two decades have now passed since Chris Hardej, a Bensonhurst resident who, at that time, was 41 and had relatives living in the Shandaken area, told the story on the day after the tragedy of how he walked down all 82 stories, made it out of No. 1 World Trade Center before it crashed down as No. 2 collapsed. He managed to make his way out of the neighborhood and over the Brooklyn Bridge on foot.  

Violet Snow and Sparrow to read from new works

Violet Snow and Sparrow to read from new works

“There’s something very compelling about connecting with your ancestors…these are things that happened 100 years ago, and it adds a layer emotionally to life,” says author Violet Snow, speaking about her new book, To March or to Marry, about which she’ll speak and from which she’ll read at the Golden Notebook’s first in person event of 2021, to be held at 2 p.m. Sunday, July 11 at Nancy’s of Woodstock Artisanal Creamery at the Peterson House in the Bearsville Center, 297 Tinker Street. 

Family on the front line: Executive director Michael Berg assesses the situation on the ground

Family on the front line: Executive director Michael Berg assesses the situation on the ground

“It’s like Woodstock 99 for four months….” says Michael Berg, Executive Director of Family of Woodstock, which began its mission back in 1970 with the goal of helping its communities with “any problem under the sun…” And now, a new one, the Corona virus pandemic which has the non-profit organization, which runs shelters, provides emergency food pantries, domestic violence services, court advocates, counseling, hotlines and child care supports, up and running around the clock.

Remembrance: Eric Weissberg

Remembrance: Eric Weissberg

I’m not the only one who loved Eric Weissberg. There are legions of us, many who were enraptured by the musical cut of the man, many who teed it up onstage beside this giant and were privileged to go along for the ride as his splendid banjo picking drove a band headlong into wild uncharted territory.

Book tackles early racial injustice in Upstate New York

Book tackles early racial injustice in Upstate New York

Back in December, 1905, when Kingston still got its water from the Zena reservoirs and Cooper Lake was twinkling in the city’s eye, Oscar Harrison was murdered near the water supply. An African American man, Cornell Van Gaasbeek, in whose house the body was found, was charged with the crime and tried in Ulster County Court. He was defended by a local reformer, part politician Augustus H. Van Buren, as the trial unfolded amid the charged racial climate of the early 20th Century.