What New Paltz newspapers said 100 years ago

These houses along North Oakwood Terrace are only a few of the homes that David C. Storr had built in his housing development called Oakwood Park. The development included a picnic grove, located at the end of what now is Grove Street and a centralized water system with a reservoir to supply the new houses. His development extended from Prospect Street to North Manheim Boulevard. (courtesy of Haviland-Heidgerd Historical Collection)

These houses along North Oakwood Terrace are only a few of the homes that David C. Storr had built in his housing development called Oakwood Park. The development included a picnic grove, located at the end of what now is Grove Street and a centralized water system with a reservoir to supply the new houses. His development extended from Prospect Street to North Manheim Boulevard. (courtesy of Haviland-Heidgerd Historical Collection)

The ‘‘Our town’’ column is compiled each month for the New Paltz Times by Carol Johnson, coordinator of the Haviland-Heidgerd Historical Collection. The entries have been copied from the November issues of the New Paltz Independent. If you would like to get a closer look at these newspapers of the past, visit Carol Johnson and the staff of the Haviland-Heidgerd Historical Collection at the Elting Memorial Library, located at 93 Main Street, or call 255-5030. Meanwhile, enjoy these words from a century ago. 

The present campaign has certainly been carried on, in a very ladylike manner. Never before have we observed such courtesy in a political campaign. There has been little mudslinging, our opponents have treated us in a very gentlemanly manner. In place of the banner strung across the street with the pictures of our candidates for president and vice-president, of which, we were so proud, in the days of old, the only banner that we see stretched across the street bears the legend “Socony” and refers to the price of gasoline. The whole case is so unusual that we do not understand it.

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We have received from the Secretary of State and have on exhibition at our office a sample copy of the ballot furnished to the soldiers on the Mexican border who are entitled to vote in this state. The ballot is six-inches wide and eight-feet long and the soldier has to write upon the line, under the title of the office the name of each man for whom he desires to vote.

There will be three ballots voted on Tuesday next — one for the state and county ticket, one for the presidential electors and one for the constitutional amendment.

Charles E. Hughes speaks at Kingston this morning at the opera house at 10:30. There will be a big automobile parade.

A new idea has come to us. The women are casting their first vote for president in a large number of states. The women, as a matter of course, are opposed to all manner of personal abuse and vituperation and no doubt are opposed to having their husbands and brothers marching and shouting for their favorite candidate till 10 p.m. or later. Now we understand why this campaign has been carried on in such a ladylike manner on both sides.

There was a number of pranks played on Halloween, that were laughable, but not serious. One of the most noticeable was the carrying of a number of chairs and tables from the porch of the Fassfern Hotel to the creamery and putting up a placard with the inscription “Meeting of the Dairyman’s League tomorrow night.”

The question of the price of milk is settled but the Dairymen’s League will be continued.

There have been many visitors at the Memorial House during the month of October, though for the whole season so far the number of registrations has been less than formerly, probably to some extent on account of the infantile paralysis quarantine. The total number of registrations this year is about 875, but there are always many who do not register.

The Schude Grape Juice Factory at Highland has taken in about 700 tons of grape this year.

Over 70 of the junior class at the Normal walked to Mohonk on Saturday, taking their lunch with them.

A representative of the state architect visited the normal grounds in company with members of the local board on Friday last to decide on the location of the new building. It is quite certain that it will be located where the test pits have been dug, northwest of the present building.

WILSON RE-ELECTED, majority not great, but enough. Wilson has 272 electoral votes, Congress Democratic by small majority. The vote in New Paltz. The Republican and Democratic vote is tabulated only. For president: Charles E. Hughes 124 votes in Dist #1; 146 votes in Dist. #2 to Woodrow Wilson’s 147 votes in Dist. #1 and 121 votes in Dist. #2.

The election on Tuesday brought to a close the most quiet presidential campaign, so far as New Paltz is concerned, that we can recollect. New York papers are not always reliable and were especially unreliable in the statement that A. P. LeFevre was defeated for member of assembly, when, in reality, he is elected by nearly 1800 majority.

Many farmers have been at work husking corn in their fields of late. Others have their corn shredded.

There is great complaint concerning hunters, who come from a great distance on the Sabbath in automobiles with dogs and guns. Sunday before last they were in the Libertyville neighborhood in full force.

It is almost impossible to realize the change that has been made in the country, as well as in villages and cities within the past few years by the building of state roads and the general introduction of automobiles.

Brass is getting so scarce that it is almost impossible to secure any for automobile repairing.

Thomas Rasich, who has had the charge of the Main Street railroad crossing for several years past, moves to Poughkeepsie, where he will be an interpreter at the Hudson River State Hospital. His place at the railroad crossing will be taken by Jacob Clearwater.

Work at the brickyard has continued late and the season has been a busy one. Large quantities of brick have been shipped to Poughkeepsie.

The new waiting room at the ferry at Highland is not quite ready for use, but soon will be.

When D. C. Storr built nearly 20 houses in our village some years ago, it was predicted that when the aqueduct engineers had gone, a considerable number of those houses would stand empty because they were too far removed from the business part of the village. However, the fact is that they have remained until the present time the most popular houses in the village to rent. These houses are not very large, but have all the conveniences and comforts and have fine mountain views.

The Freeman notes the fact that Thomas Mullinex of this town is the owner of a double barreled shot gun, made for his father Geo. Mullinex by Benj. Meakin of this town, long, long ago. Benj. Meakin used to do quite a business in the way of making and repairing guns. His shop was where the residence of his son-in-law Wm. H. Atkins now is. [Where Dunkin Donuts is today.] In Mr. Mullinex’ gun one barrel is for shot and the other for bullets.

Geo. Pratt of Highland, who has been hunting in the Adirondacks, recently shot a buck and in consequence a number of his friends had a feast on venison at Highland. Elting Harp and Lewis M. Borden started Monday for a wild turkey and quail hunt at Rapidan, Virginia.

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